Lingual Ninja! - Japanese Lessons Online

This blog is for people studying Japanese! I hope this blog helps you study basic Japanese!

Breaking

Showing posts with label Hiragana. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Hiragana. Show all posts

Jul 30, 2018

July 30, 2018

Contracted sound



In the previous article, I explained about syllabic nasal.
  Syllabic nasal >>

It is a small version of the character, つ.

Like that, there are other small characters in Japanese.

They are called "Contracted sound".

But the way to use them is a little bit different from syllabic nasal!


At first, let's check the chart of contracted sound!



The chart of contracted sound:


The line of Ky きゃ
(kya)
きゅ
(kyu)
きょ
(kyo)
The line of Sh しゃ
(sha)
しゅ
(shu)
しょ
(sho)
The line of Ch ちゃ
(cha)
ちゅ
(chu)
ちょ
(cho)
The line of Ny にゃ
(nya)
にゅ
(nyu)
にょ
(nyo)
The line of Hy ひゃ
(hya)
ひゅ
(hyu)
ひょ
(hyo)
The line of My みゃ
(mya)
みゅ
(myu)
みょ
(myo)
The line of Ry りゃ
(rya)
りゅ
(ryu)
りょ
(ryo)


The line of Gy ぎゃ
(gya)
ぎゅ
(gyu)
ぎょ
(gyo)
The line of J じゃ
(ja)
じゅ
(ju)
じょ
(jo)
The line of J ぢゃ
(ja)
ぢゅ
(ju)
ぢょ
(jo)
The line of By びゃ
(bya)
びゅ
(byu)
びょ
(byo)


The line of Py ぴゃ
(pya)
ぴゅ
(pyu)
ぴょ
(pyo)


As the table above, contracted sound is a sound written by two characters, one big character and one small character.

If you still don't remember basic Hiragana characters, please check the Hiragana chart below:

If you still don't remember ぎ, じ, or び, please remember the dull sound chart below:

If you still don't remember ぴ, please remember the P-sound chart below:



In the table of contracted sound, there are two lines of J.

Actually, the second line is not used normally.
So じゃ, じゅ, and じょ are normally used instead of ぢゃ, ぢゅ, and ぢょ if there is not some special reason.



Let's check some examples of contracted sound!




Examples:

EnglishHiraganaRomaji
catきゃっとkyatto
nuclearにゅうくりあnyukuria
joinじょいんjoin
pureぴゅpyua

If you don't remember the small character, っ for 'cat', please check the previous article.
  Syllabic nasal >>

Right column of the table is written in Japanese alphabetic letter, called "Romaji".
As I told in previous article, if you are an English speaker, you might feel "cat" and "kyatto" sound different.
But Romaji is generally used in Japan to convert Hiragana and Katakana into alphabet.
Please check the article below for further information about Romaji:
  Romaji >>

I hope this article helps you study Japanese!
Thank you for reading!


Related articles:

    Hiragana quiz >>

    Hiragana chart >>

    Dull sound >>

    P-sound >>

    Syllabic nasal >>

    Romaji chart >>

July 30, 2018

Syllabic nasal



In this article, let me talk about syllabic nasal!

Syllabic nasal is the sound of the word, ''.

Is that ' (tsu)'?

No no.
Please look at the letter well...


It is a little bit smaller than normal Hiragana.


Let's compare:

Normal HiraganaSyllabic nasal

Can you see the difference?


Let's check how it is used!

Example:

EnglishHiraganaRomaji
hatはっとhatto
bookぶっくbukku
getげっとgetto
kickきっくkikku
fashionふぁっしょんfasshon
lollipopろりぽっぷroripoppu

If you still don't remember basic Hiragana characters, please check the Hiragana chart below:
  Hiragana chart >>

If you still don't remember ぶ and げ, please remember the dull sound chart below:
  Dull sound >>

If you still don't remember ぽ and ぷ, please remember the P-sound chart below:
  P-sound >>


Regarding the first example in the table, はっと is from the English word, "hat".

Like hat, っ is used for the word you should stop the sound in the middle of the word.

If we remove っ from 'はっと(hatto)', it becomes 'はと(hato)'.
はと means pigeon, and it is a different word.


Right column of the table is written in Japanese alphabetic letter, called "Romaji".
If you are an English speaker, maybe you feel "hat" and "hatto" sounds different.
But Romaji is generally used in Japan to convert Hiragana and Katakana into alphabet.

Please check the article below for further information about Romaji:
  Romaji >>



っ is the small version of つ.
Like that, there are still other small Hiragana characters.

I will explain other small characters called "contracted sound" in the next article.
  Contracted sound >>


I hope this article helps you study Japanese!
Thank you for reading!




July 30, 2018

P-sound



In this article, please let me explain about "P-sound"!

However, if you have already understood the explanation about basic Hiragana and Dull sound, this article is quite easy for you!

   Basic Hiragana chart >>

   Dull sound >>


"P-sound" is quite similar to "Dull sound".

Let's look at the chart of the P-sound characters at first!


The chart of P-sound characters is below:

The line of P ぱ (pa) ぴ (pi) ぷ (pu) ぺ (pe) ぽ (po)



Is that all!?

Yes, that's all.

Only those 5 characters are P-sound in Japanese.


Let's compare them with basic Hiragana characters:

The line of H は (ha) ひ (hi) ふ (fu) へ (he) ほ (ho)



Did you notice the rule?

If you want to make the P-sound character, you just put a small circle at the upper right of the basic character.

The small circle is called "P-sound consonant mark".
Isn't this so similar to the rule of "Dull sound"?


In the next article, let's talk about Syllabic nasal!
  Syllabic nasal >>


I hope this article helps you study Japanese.
Thank you for reading!

July 30, 2018

Dull sound


Hiragana's basic rule is explained in the previous article!
  Hiragana list >>


In addition to that, you should understand "Dull sound"!


Dull sound is based on basic Hiragana characters.

They are like below:

The line of G が (ga) ぎ (gi) ぐ (gu) げ (ge) ご (go)
The line of Z ざ (za) じ (ji) ず (zu) ぜ (ze) ぞ (zo)
The line of D だ (da) ぢ (ji) づ (zu) で (de) ど (do)
The line of B ば (ba) び (bi) ぶ (bu) べ (be) ぼ (bo)

What do you think?
Is this easy to remember.

When you compare this with the basic Hiragana chart, you will know this is quite easy.

Below is a part of the basic Hiragana chart corresponded to dull sound:

The line of K か (ka) き (ki) く (ku) け (ke) こ (ko)
The line of S さ (sa) し (shi) す (su) せ (se) そ (so)
The line of T た (ta) ち (chi) つ (tsu) て (te) と (to)
The line of H は (ha) ひ (hi) ふ (fu) へ (he) ほ (ho)

Have you already remembered the chart above?

When you want to write a character of dull sound, you just need to write two small points at the upper right of the character.
(You will see it when you compare the two charts above.)

These two small points are called "sonant mark".


Officially, there are only 20 characters of dull sound in the chart, and they are easy to remember, right?


Sometimes Japanese people give the sonant mark to other Hiragana characters, like あ(a).

But it is not official.
Maybe you will see that way to use a sonant mark on the internet.

However, I recommend you to use sonant mark only for the 20 characters above, because it is the official way to use it.



In the next article, I will explain about P-sound!
  P-sound >>


I hope this article helps you study Japanese.
Thank you for reading this article!

July 30, 2018

Japanese Hiragana chart


In previous article, I explained that there are three types of characters in Japanese.
  The three types of Japanese characters >>


In this article, let me talk about the Hiragana chart!

After memorizing the Hiragana chart, please use this to check your memory of Hiragana:
   Hiragana quiz >>



Below is the Hiragana chart:

The line of A
(a)

(i)

(u)

(e)

(o)
The line of K
(ka)

(ki)

(ku)

(ke)

(ko)
The line of S
(sa)

(shi)

(su)

(se)

(so)
The line of T
(ta)

(chi)

(tsu)

(te)

(to)
The line of N
(na)

(ni)

(nu)

(ne)

(no)
The line of H
(ha)

(hi)

(fu)

(he)

(ho)
The line of M
(ma)

(mi)

(mu)

(me)

(mo)
The line of Y
(ya)

(yu)

(yo)
The line of R
(ra)

(ri)

(ru)

(re)

(ro)
The line of W
(wa)

(wo)

(n)



Basically, 46 characters above are all the Hiragana you should remember.

Even if you can't remember all of the Hiragana above quickly, you don't need to be sad.
You will see many examples using Hiragana characters, and you will get used to them soon.



By the way, did you find the rule of the Hiragana chart?


Hiragana chart is classified by vowels and consonants.


In the hiragana chart, there are 10 lines, A, K, S, T, N, H, M, Y, R, and W.
They are consonants. 
However, there is no consonants for the first line, A.

For each line, there are 5 letters correspondent with 5 vowels, aiue, and o.

It is the rule of the Hiragana chart.
However, you may have two things which you think are strange.




#1. There are only three words in the line of Y!

Yes, there are only three characters in that line.
Probably, the reason is that they are difficult to pronounce.

Can you pronounce "yi" and "ye"?
For a Japanese speaker, it is very uncomfortable to pronounce!

Actually, in the very old Japanese character chart, "yi" and "ye" were included.
However, they are normally not used now.




#2. The line of W is strange!

Yes, that line is very strange.
There are only three characters in this line.
In addition to that, why is 'ん(n)' here?

Please just remember this line.

Actually, 'ん(n)' should not be included in this line.
But 'ん(n)' is a special character for Japanese.
So we just want to put it somewhere.
That's why we put it at the end of the Hiragana chart normally.

I need to explain one more thing about the line of W.
It is 'を(wo)'.

Actually, 'を(wo)' is also a special character in Japanese.
The case to use 'を(wo)' is limited.

For knowing the details of 'を(wo)', please check this:
  Particle "を(wo)" >>


'を(wo)' is always put just after objects (noun) of the sentence.

For example, if you eat a cake, you will put 'を(wo)' after cake, like:

   "cakeを"




Do these sound hard?

But if you remember all Hiragana characters, you can pronounce all Japanese sounds!


Let's learn more Hiragana rule, "Dull sound", "P-sound",  "Syllabic nasal", and "Contracted sound", from the next article.


Also, please use the Hiragana quiz to confirm if you remember all Hiragana characters!
   Hiragana quiz >>


I hope this article helps you study Japanese!
Thank you for reading!